Sporting Recovery https://sportingrecovery.org.uk exercise for mental wellness Wed, 27 Apr 2022 09:08:58 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/SR-Logo-v7_Full-logo-13-150x150.png Sporting Recovery https://sportingrecovery.org.uk 32 32 Exercise with Music https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/12/29/exercise-music/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=exercise-music https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/12/29/exercise-music/#respond Sun, 29 Dec 2019 20:37:00 +0000 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=467 Music for Wellness Moving your body to music can have some surprising effects on both the body and mind. It has been fundamental to the human experience for thousands of years. No matter what your favourite tune, music along with physical movement can have a huge effect on your wellbeing. https://youtu.be/9NAlOfKIxYY Dancing can improve your […]

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Music for Wellness

Moving your body to music can have some surprising effects on both the body and mind. It has been fundamental to the human experience for thousands of years. No matter what your favourite tune, music along with physical movement can have a huge effect on your wellbeing.

Dancing can improve your mental and physical health

Moving your body to music or dancing for short can improve physical and mental health. The benefits can be as follows:

Improve posture and flexibility

Lift your mood

Keep your mind sharp

Ease anxiety

Make new friends

Help your heart

Fun activity

Reduce pain and stiffness

There is no doubt that dance, in whatever form it may take, is a brilliant form of exercise. Moving your body in all directions for an extended period of time with all the enthusiasm we can muster is great for improving your physical health. 

Sporting Recovery Dance-A-Thon

Soca & Afrobeats Danceathon  community fundraiser event in the heart of Peckham

25th January 2020

Why not come to our Wellness Clubs, they are on every Wednesday afternoon at the;

Damilola Taylor Centre, 1 East Surrey Grove in Peckham SE15 SE6.

Join our Wellness Clubs below and experience the benefits of exercise, increase your self-esteem and social inclusion.

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Wellbeing Toolkit https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/11/16/toolkit/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=toolkit https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/11/16/toolkit/#respond Sat, 16 Nov 2019 09:35:00 +0000 http://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=121 SR Well-Being Scale Toolkit We all expect to get a cold or sore throat from time to time but when it comes to the way we feel emotionally, it can be hard to recognise or admit that we’re not feeling 100%. This Well-Being toolkit is designed to recommend some excellent resources to help you better […]

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SR Well-Being Scale Toolkit

We all expect to get a cold or sore throat from time to time but when it comes to the way we feel emotionally, it can be hard to recognise or admit that we’re not feeling 100%.

This Well-Being toolkit is designed to recommend some excellent resources to help you better understand how you feel. You should answer based on how you’ve been feeling over the last two weeks.

You may find that your mood usually goes both up and down, so use this questionnaire to monitor it over time but remember, it is not intended to replace a consultation with a GP if you are struggling

Well Being Scale Toolkit

If you scored between 0-22

Your wellbeing score is low.

We recommend you register with our Wellbeing Programme for support. You may also want to talk to a friend or doctor about improving your emotional wellbeing.

If you scored between 23-30

Your wellbeing score is moderate

Why not take action to improve your mental wellbeing?

Take a look at the support services available from Southwark Hub . You may also want to join our wellness clubs.

If you scored between 31-35

Your wellbeing score is high

Good news, your wellbeing score is above average.

Five steps to mental wellbeing

Below are five things evidence-based actions which can really help to boost mental wellbeing:

  • Get active
  • Connect with others
  • Keep learning
  • Be aware of yourself and the world
  • Give to others

Why not come to our Wellness Clubs, they are on every Wednesday afternoon at the;

Damilola Taylor Centre, 1 East Surrey Grove in Peckham SE15 SE6.

Join our Wellness Clubs below and experience the benefits of exercise, increase your self-esteem and social inclusion.

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Break the cycle of Addiction https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/25/break-the-cycle-of-addiction/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=break-the-cycle-of-addiction https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/25/break-the-cycle-of-addiction/#respond Fri, 25 Oct 2019 18:17:03 +0000 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=2868 7 Ways to Break the Cycle of Addiction Your addiction changed everything about you, and these changes likely weren’t for the better. It’s time to take the best parts of yourself back. While traditional behavioral therapy is a good starting point, you may need a little extra encouragement to help keep you on the right […]

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7 Ways to Break the Cycle of Addiction

Your addiction changed everything about you, and these changes likely weren’t for the better. It’s time to take the best parts of yourself back. While traditional behavioral therapy is a good starting point, you may need a little extra encouragement to help keep you on the right track when you’re not under supervision. Here are 7 alternative therapies to consider: 

Neurofeedback

Neurofeedback, a form of biofeedback, has been used for more than four decades to help patients overcome emotional traumas such as PTSD. In recent years, it has gained speed for helping addicts overcome many relapse triggers, including insomnia, anxiety and anger.

Exercise

Exercise offers numerous benefits to the addicted brain. Working out strengthens the mind and body and triggers the release of endorphins. Exercise can mitigate stress and improves overall mood and energy levels. Whether you need a motivator like a workout buddy or a helpful nudge from one of the newest top-of-the-line smartwatches or fitness trackers on the market, look for ways to spur physical activity every day.

Register below and join the Sporting Recovery Gym Club. A safe place to perform your exercise programme with like minded friends…

Nutrition therapy

Nutrition therapy has long been used to help cancer patients ease the digestive symptoms of their disease. But evidence suggests that getting the right balance of vitamins, minerals and nutrients can also lessen the physical burden of addiction. Whole food plant-based nutrition has been a route of success for many recovering addicts, as it aids greatly in the healing process. Gut health should also be considered when it comes to nutrition therapy, as an unhappy microbiome can perpetuate mood imbalance. Along with whole foods, be sure to introduce probiotics and fermented foods to boost your digestive system.

Mindfulness and meditation

Mindfulness is the practice of being aware and in the moment, and meditation can help regulate your mood. It does so by affecting neurotransmitters in the brain that release the stress hormone cortisol. There are those who also argue that regular meditation can purge the body of toxins. Another way to promote mindfulness and stay in the moment is through prayer and spiritual awakening, which can not only alter the course of your life but put you on the path to a greater relationship with God.

Animal therapy

Animals, especially dogs and horses, are commonly found in rehabilitative settings. They are especially effective in helping enhance mood. Spending time with companion animals can reduce the sensation of pain, boost self-esteem and help regulate heart rate and blood pressure. Many addicts report that caring for an animal helps them feel more confident in their recovery efforts.

Addiction

Art therapy

An activity-based therapy similar to gardening and animal therapy, art therapy is used as a tool of self-expression and may build self-confidence in recovering substance abusers.

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)

NAD is a naturally occurring substance found in all living cells. It’s a derivative of niacin and is essential to basic cellular processes. Given in IV form, NAD can help support cravings and ease withdrawal symptoms. Studies are currently underway to determine the viability of NADs in healing age-related mitochondrial damage.

It is important to note that these therapies alone are likely not sufficient to treat substance abuse disorders. Instead, they may provide added support during the long ascent that is recovery. Drug addiction is not just a problem, it’s a disease that requires expert attention and individual therapy. And like other diseases, it is one that may be overcome with the right care, which may be enhanced by any number of supplemental therapies.

Written by Ryan Randolph

More information available at www.sportingrecovery.org.uk or call 0300 030 1233

Sporting Recovery is open every Wednesday afternoon from 12pm 

Damilola Taylor Centre,
1 East Surrey Grove,
Peckham, 
SE15 SE6.

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You are what you eat https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/19/you-are-what-you-eat/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=you-are-what-you-eat https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/19/you-are-what-you-eat/#respond Sat, 19 Oct 2019 15:38:51 +0000 http://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=226 Eat a balanced diet and make your body healthy You are what you eat. Having a good nutrition is an integral part of a healthy lifestyle. This is even more so when we engage in physical activity. Sporting Recovery lifestyle programme involves good food choices, ensuring you have enough energy to participate, which in turn […]

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Eat a balanced diet and make your body healthy

You are what you eat. Having a good nutrition is an integral part of a healthy lifestyle.

This is even more so when we engage in physical activity. Sporting Recovery lifestyle programme involves good food choices, ensuring you have enough energy to participate, which in turn helps training and aids recovery. Eat a varied and well-balanced diet that supplies the right amount of energy and essential nutrients.

Food is the fuel for our body. Nature has a colorful variety of food options, particularly fruits and vegetables. When fueling i.e. feeding the body, there is “healthy food” and there is “junk food.” Initially, both will produce energy. Healthy food provides the right kinds of energy and enhances the operation of the body’s complex systems. It also strengthens its resilience against disease, and increases its durability and longevity. Junk food, on the other hand, has essentially the opposite effect in all these areas. It contributes to the breaking down of the body over time.

Food for thought

A balanced mood and feelings of wellbeing can be protected by our diet.  

It is crucial to get your food and fluid intake right if you want to enjoy a good health, to recover quicker from training sessions and generally enjoy exercise. Protein, fluids, fat, carbohydrates, fruit and vegetables are required for building and repairing your body and plays an important role in how you respond to exercise. 

Water Anyone?

Waterdrop

Not drinking enough fluid has significant implications for mental health. The early effects of even mild dehydration can affect our feelings, mental performance and behaviour. The effects becoming more noticeable as the body gets progressively more dehydrated.

Maintaining adequate hydration is essential for good health. 

It is important to start each day well hydrated. You should take on-board appropriate fluids during day and restore hydration levels as soon as possible afterwards.

Fuel up

Healthy Food

No matter what you do your body requires carbohydrates to move. Exercising muscles rely on carbohydrate as their main source of fuel. The amount and type you need will depend on what you are doing. In general, the more intense the physical activity, the more carbohydrate you need to include in your diet. A diet low in carbohydrate can lead to a lack of energy during exercise, early fatigue, loss of concentration and delayed recovery.

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Mental health and Boxing https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/16/effects-of-boxing-on-mental-health/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=effects-of-boxing-on-mental-health https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/16/effects-of-boxing-on-mental-health/#respond Wed, 16 Oct 2019 01:16:16 +0000 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=2730 Boxing Anyone? Despite the inherent dangers of contact Boxing, the exercise regime involved can have a positive effect on your health. This is both physically and mentally. The following article from exercise.co.uk gives us an insight into the power of non-contact boxing on mental health. Join our Gym Club and try Non-Contact Boxing Book Now […]

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Boxing Anyone?

Despite the inherent dangers of contact Boxing, the exercise regime involved can have a positive effect on your health. This is both physically and mentally. The following article from exercise.co.uk gives us an insight into the power of non-contact boxing on mental health.

Boxing 1

Outside of these physical benefits, the effect that boxing can have on your mental well being is a factor that is worth remembering too. There’s so much more to boxing than just mindlessly fighting other people to see who the better fighter is. Every step of the way from building your stamina to mastering your skills in the ring can have a genuine and permanent effect on your mental health.

Exercise release endorphins

First and foremost, there’s the already established link between exercise and mental health. It’s a proven concept that any form of physical activity is a great way to improve your general health. The more you move, the more endorphins your body releases giving you that awesome feel-good feeling after your workouts.

You also have to more long-term benefits that exercising can have too though. Just doing more exercise on a daily basis can help you to form healthier habits and become a more productive person, giving you that feel good experience outside of your training too!

Stress reliever/anger management

More specifically related to boxing, there’s the fact of it being a positive outlet for emotional feelings too. You can really put in all of your aggression to some heavy punch bag work to help improve your punching power and technique. It’s essential to deal with your emotions in a healthy and positive way, and this is one of the best ways you can do it if it’s what works for you.

On the other hand, even without a physically aggressive response, boxing can still help you manage your stresses or anger. Just allowing yourself actually to be immersed in your training pattern is one of the best things you can do to be able to get inside your own head and think through any issues rationally. Some time to yourself is always useful, no matter how you feel.

Social benefits of training

Even with the immersive benefits, it doesn’t mean that boxing has to be something that isolates you all the time. The idea of training as a whole, no matter how you’re doing it, will probably involve at least one other person. It can be anything from using focus pads with your trainer or opponent through to doing cardio together for motivation and more enjoyable experiences.

So we know that training with a partner can help your physical performance and the results that the training is giving. It can also give you a chance to voice your thoughts over a productive training session so that you make friends along the way. You can talk through things with someone else about life in general, or specifically about ways to improve your training. Either way, the social aspect of training is always a good thing to experience.

Anxiety and depression & self esteem

When looking more specifically into mental health, there are also a lot of different ways boxing can help to deal with many of the symptoms of anxiety and depression. Most of these ways do stem from the points above, but they aren’t limited to them. Boxing can be an excellent place to draw some added confidence from as you become more comfortable with your training.

It can help you to find a comfortable and safe space for you to improve your fitness in your own ways in your own time. You can train to do whatever you want to do, as often as you like, with whoever you like. Even just being able to take some time out of your daily schedule to do something you’ll enjoy can be a good way to build self-confidence and esteem. Find what works for you!

Boxing front page 2

Focus, concentration and stratergy

Finally, there are more benefits specifically to boxing than a lot of other exercises as well. Boxing is a great way to learn how to train tactically to reach your goals. You may be training to improve your strength but stay in your means with weight classes. On the flip side, you may be training to improve your cardio health or weight loss. Either way, you need to train smart and you’ll pick this up quickly.

The technique that boxing requires is another awesome way to do this too though. As you train more and more, you’ll begin to find your own style of training and fighting. You’ll start creating your own boxing persona and learn how to deal with different situations in the best possible way and keep the upper hand.

All exercise is good for your health at the end of the day, and mental well being is no exception. Boxing might not be the best thing for everyone, but its results, the success stories and the benefits it has on mental health behind it are definitely worth thinking about. Train your own way and do what makes you comfortable. Everybody has to start somewhere and has their own preferences, but boxing could be an alternative way to exercise you may not have considered and have even more benefits too!

Before beginning any exercise or nutrition program, consult your physician, doctor or other professional. This is especially important for individuals over the age of 35 or persons with pre-existing health problems. Exercise.co.uk assumes no responsibility for personal injury or property damage sustained using our advice.

If you experience dizziness, nausea, chest pain, or any other abnormal symptoms, stop the workout at once and consult a physician or doctor immediately.

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Punch Bag https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/15/punch-bag/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=punch-bag https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/15/punch-bag/#respond Tue, 15 Oct 2019 17:28:53 +0000 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=2739 A Punch Bag workout that’s great for mental health Not only is punching a bag a great way to relieve stress and improve your mental fitness. Why not get your sweat on and benefit from a tremendous full-body workout? Try the 10-minute punch bag workout from exercise.co.uk if you want a challenge. https://youtu.be/vx40lmUNAlo Join our […]

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A Punch Bag workout that's great for mental health

Not only is punching a bag a great way to relieve stress and improve your mental fitness. Why not get your sweat on and benefit from a tremendous full-body workout? Try the 10-minute punch bag workout from exercise.co.uk if you want a challenge.

Mental Health Benefit of Non-Contact Boxing

All you need are some boxing gloves and you can gain self-confidence, stress relief and so much more…

Stimulate your endorphin production
Switch off from the outside world
Teaches you about yourself
Manage your anger
Build physical and mental strength

Why not come to our programme and try non-contact boxing, you will like it!!

Our Wellness Clubs is on every Wednesday afternoon at the;

Damilola Taylor Centre, 1 East Surrey Grove in Peckham SE15 SE6.

Join one of our Wellness Clubs below and experience the benefits of exercise, increase your self-esteem and social inclusion.

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Intermittent Fasting https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/15/intermittent-fasting/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=intermittent-fasting https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/10/15/intermittent-fasting/#respond Tue, 15 Oct 2019 17:26:12 +0000 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=2736 Intermittent fasting and mental health One of the world’s most popular health and fitness trends is currently intermittent fasting. How does it affect your mental wellness is a question that deserves further investigation. This study explains that in participants after 48-hours of fasting, “cognitive performance, activity, sleep, and mood are not adversely affected in healthy humans by […]

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Intermittent fasting and mental health

One of the world’s most popular health and fitness trends is currently intermittent fasting. How does it affect your mental wellness is a question that deserves further investigation.

This study explains that in participants after 48-hours of fasting, “cognitive performance, activity, sleep, and mood are not adversely affected in healthy humans by two days of calorie-deprivation.”

Intermittent Fasting

What is intermittent fasting, and how does it work?

Intermittent fasting is something we do daily without realising. Simply put, intermittent fasting involves alternating cycles of not eating  and eating during the day. It’s not starving yourself. When we sleep we are experiencing a time of not eating. You can change the time of the fasting, and the duration,

Our body requires fuel or calories to burn, if we don’t feed our bodies, it burns calories already stored, typically in the form of fat. However, it’s a dietary preference for burning fat, and different things may work differently for different people. Here is the article in full www.exercise.co.uk/intermittent-fasting/

Mental Health & Fasting

Mood Management

Not eating can be stressful, however, fasting effect can benefit the control of mood changes. Instead of experiencing negative moods and anxiety, the lack of food will increase the presence of adaptive chemicals to protect the brain and body. Simply speaking, the restriction of food will enhance a positive mood and reduce the chance of mood swings. 

Increased Immune System

During the first few weeks of intermittent fasting the body is required to adapt to the starvation process. This adaptation procedure involves the release of various catecholamines in the body, including adrenaline and dopamine. The release of these chemicals, and the steroid hormone, contributes to stronger mood control and a boost in the immune system. Many individuals who use this intermittent fasting technique have shown more positive responses when faced with stressful situations.

Reducing Migraines And Chronic Headaches

Research has indicated that the intermittent fasting technique is associated with increased levels of serotonin in the brain. This raise in serotonin can be an explanation for the intermittent fasting strategies ability to reduce chronic headaches and migraines. It should be noted that while this method is beneficial to reduce headaches, it is not recommended for all individuals. Individuals who are suffering from pre-existing medical conditions and require the use of prescribed pharmaceuticals should definitely speak with their health care provider before undergoing this type of weight management strategy.

Conclusion

Overall, studies show there are various fasting techniques that can assist with both physical and mental difficulties. This ancient practice has been revered for ages as a health and spiritual tool. Clinicians have reported finding improvements in mood, mental clarity, vigilance, a sense of improved well-being, and sometimes euphoria. 

For more info, check out sites like Hardvard Health or the Intermittent fasting benefits

Our Wellness Clubs are on every Wednesday at the Damilola Taylor Centre, 1 East Surrey Grove in Peckham SE15 SE6.

Join our Wellness Clubs below and experience the benefits of exercise, increase your self-esteem and social inclusion.

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What They Don’t Say https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/09/17/what-they-may-not-tell-you-say/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-they-may-not-tell-you-say https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/09/17/what-they-may-not-tell-you-say/#respond Tue, 17 Sep 2019 15:05:59 +0000 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=2631 What Doctors may not tell you There is a mountain of information available about mental health. It’s not unexpected that Doctors may not tell all. The following organisations are useful resources to help you and your family to better navigate the world of mental health and to explore the different approaches to mental health, and […]

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What Doctors may not tell you

There is a mountain of information available about mental health. It’s not unexpected that Doctors may not tell all. The following organisations are useful resources to help you and your family to better navigate the world of mental health and to explore the different approaches to mental health, and a wide range of responses to it.

The English Hearing Voices Network are one of many similar networks around the world. If you hear voices, see visions or have similar sensory experiences – you’re not alone. The statistics vary, but somewhere between 3 and 10% of the population have experiences like these.

The Icarus Project is a support network and education project by and for people who experience the world in ways that are often diagnosed as mental illness.

ISPS works to promote greater knowledge of the different psychological approaches to psychosis and psychotic experiences – psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioural, arts-based, family and holistic approaches – and their better integration with each other and with pharmaceutical approaches

The Critical Psychiatry Network – a network of like minded psychiatrists who are unafraid to ask difficult questions of their own profession.  They do not offer clinical advice.

And there is more to tell

Check out our second part to find out more information doctors may not tell you.

Why not try one of our Wellness Clubs, they are on every Wednesday afternoon at the;

Damilola Taylor Centre, 1 East Surrey Grove in Peckham SE15 SE6.

Join our Wellness Clubs below and experience the benefits of exercise, increase your self-esteem and social inclusion.

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What They Don’t Say 2 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/09/17/what-we-are-not-told/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-we-are-not-told https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/09/17/what-we-are-not-told/#respond Tue, 17 Sep 2019 13:58:53 +0000 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=2619 What Doctors may not tell you (2) Publications that are useful resources to help you and your family to better navigate the world of mental health and to explore the different approaches to mental health, and a wide range of responses to it. A Straight Talking Introduction to Psychiatric Drugs By Dr Joanna Moncrieff Most […]

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What Doctors may not tell you (2)

Publications that are useful resources to help you and your family to better navigate the world of mental health and to explore the different approaches to mental health, and a wide range of responses to it.

By Dr Joanna Moncrieff

Most of us are familiar with the use of anti-psychotic medications and their side affects but are not informed about the long term affects of these medications.  This publication gives useful information about anti-psychotics, and crucially, suggests a list of questions that you and your family should ask when being offered anti-psychotic medication.

A Key to the Recovery of Emotional Wellbeing, Mental Health and the Prevention of Mental Health Problems

By Terry Lynch, Marianne Murphy

…”Dr Lynch found that a reduced sense of self is an ever-present feature of people experiencing a lot of anxiety and those diagnosed with psychiatric illnesses.  In “Selfhood”, Terry Lynch sets out what he found to be the components of a solid sense of self.  He outlines many actions people can take to raise their sense of self.  Terry outlines how he works in his recover-focused mental health practice…”

Mind, Brain and Body in the Transformation of Trauma

By Bessel Van Der Kolk

“The effects of Trauma can be devastating for sufferers, their families and future generations.

Here, one of the world’s experts on traumatic stress offers a bold new paradigm for treatment, moving away from standard talking therapies and towards an alternative approach that heals mind, brain and body”.

Integrating traumatic experiences

By Franz Ruppert

Professor Franz Ruppert explores the impact of trauma across generations.  By understanding the processes involved, we can successfully work with trauma as a personal experience and as an inheritance from our family system. Ruppert gives a very useful account of his thinking about the methodology of Constellations as a means of achieving understanding and integration.

Towards a Paradigm Shift in Our Understanding and Treatment of Psychosis

By Paris Williams PH.D

“Those of us diagnosed with that crushing word, ‘psychotic’, are too often given labels and false information that result in hopelessness.  In Rethinking Madness, Dr Williams turns this ‘no hope model’ on its head.  Dr Williams effectively challenges outdated, disproven, harmful theories that still dominate today’s mental health industry.  Most importantly, Dr Williams closely listens to people who have been through the experiences so often labelled ‘psychotic’.  Not only does this book show there is hope for full recovery and reintegration into society, but there is plenty of evidence here that this journey may have surprising benefits both for the psychiatric survivor, and for our sick-souled society itself”

Understanding Issues around Immigration and Attachment

By Elaine Arnold

Elaine Arnold argues that knowledge of attachment theory is essential in order to work effectively with African-Caribbean clients who have experienced separation and loss through immigration. It has been over 60 years since large numbers of African-Caribbean people arrived in England expecting to find work. In this book the pattern of African-Caribbean family life, pre- and post-migration, are explored. Discrimination and institutional racism are highlighted, and implications for teachers and professionals in the helping services emphasized. “Working with Families of African-Caribbean Origin” is essential reading for psychologists, psychotherapists, doctors, counselors, social workers, health workers and teachers working with people of African-Caribbean or other ethnic and cultural backgrounds who have experienced separation or loss through immigration.

Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Psychosis

By John Reid and Jacqui Dillon

Are hallucinations and delusions really symptoms of an illness called ‘schizophrenia’? Are mental health problems really caused by chemical imbalances and genetic predispositions? Are psychiatric drugs as effective and safe as the drug companies claim? Is madness preventable?

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Tai Chi for Beginners https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/09/07/tai-chi-beginners/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tai-chi-beginners https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/2019/09/07/tai-chi-beginners/#respond Sat, 07 Sep 2019 16:34:14 +0000 https://sportingrecovery.org.uk/?p=479 Tai Chi beginner classes Tai Chi, also called tai chi chuan, is an ancient Chinese tradition. It is today practiced as a graceful health-promoting form of gentle exercise. Having is roots in 13th century martial arts, it combines deep breathing and relaxation with flowing movements. It is very accessible and has a lower impact than […]

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Tai Chi beginner classes

Tai Chi, also called tai chi chuan, is an ancient Chinese tradition. It is today practiced as a graceful health-promoting form of gentle exercise. Having is roots in 13th century martial arts, it combines deep breathing and relaxation with flowing movements. It is very accessible and has a lower impact than many other forms of exercise. This makes it ideal for inactive older people wanting to raise their activity levels gently and gradually.

This is a gentle way to fight stress, reduce anxiety, increase flexibility and balance.

Done correctly, you’ll find that the poses flow smoothly from one into another. Many movements are completed with bent knees in a squat-like position

Tai chi has many physical and emotional benefits. Some of the benefits include decreased anxiety and depression and improvements in cognition. It involves a series of movements performed in a slow, focused manner and accompanied by deep breathing.

The benefits may include:

  • Decreased stress, anxiety and depression
  • Improved mood
  • Improved aerobic capacity
  • Increased energy and stamina
  • Improved flexibility, balance and agility
  • Improved muscle strength and definition

Regularly practicing may help you to have more restful sleep and can result in weight loss.

Many of the movements can be adapted to people with a disability, including wheelchair users.

Tai Chi in the Park 2

Our Tai Chi beginner classes for adults is an exercise class referral programme for anyone who is or has suffered from mental distress. All are welcome. Tai chi is generally considered to be a safe exercise with few side effects. However, you may experience some slight aches or pains after practicing tai chi in the beginning. Don’t worry these will soon go as you practice more. If you have a medical condition or any health concerns, or haven’t exercised for a long time, speak to your GP before you start tai chi.

Classes start at 13:45 and last for 1 hour every Wednesday at the Damilola Taylor Centre, 1 East Surrey Grove in Peckham SE15 SE6.

For more information contact us or email help@sportingrecovery.org.uk,

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